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Cortido - mexican sauerkraut
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Troy McClure
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
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Location: Springfield

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2005 9:19 pm    Post subject: Cortido - mexican sauerkraut Reply with quote

Cortido is the Mexican/Latin American version of sauerkraut, and apparently a variation of this condiment is served at every meal.

Naturally it makes a great accompanyment to mexican/latin food, but also goes great with other cuisines.

Easier to make than kimchi, and tastier than sauerkraut this recipe posseses the ideal taste/effort ratio.

The recipe I followed is from Nourishing Traditions:

1 large cabbage, cored and shredded.
1 cup carrots, grated
2 medium onions, quatered lengthwise and very finely sliced
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon sea-salt
4 tablespoons whey (if not available add an additional tablespoon of salt instead).

I deviated from the standard recipe by using red onions (which are much swetter/milder) and I think suit fermented foods more.

Also I used 1/2 green cabbage and 1/2 red cabbage.

Mix up all the ingredients in a large bowl. Then pound with a wooden pounder for about 10 minutes to release juices.

Place in a container and cover with water innoculated with either whey or salt. Cover with a plate and weigh down with a clean object (e.g. a glass full of water).

There are many ways of protecting the ferment from air, and the above is the one I have settled on. But any variation will do - as long as it excludes air.

Leave at room temperature for 3-5 days. Then transfer to cold storage (either a cellar or the fridge).

Like sauerkraut, cortido improves with age, but can be eaten after the initial ferment.

Enjoy!
Wink
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shelley
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
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Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2005 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now this sounds really tempting - red onions and oregano.... yummm..............! Very Happy
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Troy McClure
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
Posts: 196
Location: Springfield

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 2:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't really cooked much with oregano before - and boy does it smell nice. I expected it to be mild, but it certainly affects the smell.

Cortido is *a lot* easier to make than kimchi, and a lot easier to get right. Kimchi also seems to have too many ingredients - too many competing flavours which have to be balanced. Where as everything in Cortido seems to go together, so you don't have to be precise with the ratios.

It really is as easy as cabbage, carrots, onions & spices. Then either salt or whey to ferment. Mash for 10 mins. Wait 3 days and voila!
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shelley
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I might try both at the same time - might as well, means more bang for the time spent shopping and chopping! Smile
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h0ppy
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
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Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 5:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think avocado would go good with it?
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shelley
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Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the side, yes, but not fermented with it. It will just rot.
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Troy McClure
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
Posts: 196
Location: Springfield

PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2005 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

shelley wrote:
I might try both at the same time - might as well, means more bang for the time spent shopping and chopping! Smile


Actually thats how I ended up making cortido! I had half a red cabbage and half a white cabbage left after making kimchi.

Surprisingly it is ok to put fruits in a ferment. In the kimchi recipe I posted she says that people often add apples & pears etc.

The only problem with fermenting avacado is that it is a high fat food which isn't all that high in sugars. So I would definitely not ferment it on its own, but as part of a larger ferment it should be fine. The other thing is you probably want to put it in *after* you mash the ingredients otherwise you'll just end up with guacamole!

The worst case scenario is that nothing happens to it, but it will still get preserved.
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Troy McClure
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
Posts: 196
Location: Springfield

PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2005 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cortido Update

Ok its been 4 days now and the cortido is done. Its tastes really good - acidic, but not overly so. The oregano gives it a really nice flavour. I probably could have added more chillies though. What can I say - I like it hot and spicy!

The only thing I would possibly change is that I used red cabbage, which (not surprsingly) turns everything red!! On the one hand this is jam-packed full of valuable antioxidants (Anthocyanins). On the other hand you lose that variation of colour which so adds to the enjoyment of food.

So next time I'm just going to use green cabbage.

Overall easily the best ferment I have made so far. Thoroughly recommended!! Wink
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shelley
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
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Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, I now have two small Mason jars with a sort-of cortido in them sitting in my pantry. Smile Napa cabbage, red onion, marjoram and basil because I was out of oregano, red pepper flakes, and of course salt.
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Troy McClure
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Joined: 24 Dec 2004
Posts: 196
Location: Springfield

PostPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

shelley wrote:
Okay, I now have two small Mason jars with a sort-of cortido in them sitting in my pantry. Smile Napa cabbage, red onion, marjoram and basil because I was out of oregano, red pepper flakes, and of course salt.


That sounds like a nice combo. But presumably you added salt? If you don't use a starter of some kind you need salt to help the good bacteria get going.
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shelley
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Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yep, probably more than I needed since I didn't pound up the entire cabbage.
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J F
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Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 369

PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, this sounds heavenly, especially with peppers and red pepper flakes!

What effect do peppers have on the liver? Do they, like black pepper, wake the liver up and stimulate it to flush itself? I ask because I'm currently on a salsa/chili binge. My body seems to be craving hot and spicy, and I live in Las Vegas, so I know it's not because of the cold winter months that I'm gobbling spicy foods up. LOL
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shelley
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
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Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 3:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peppers are very stimulating to the liver. If ever you have "liver heat" issues (nausea, vomiting, tenderness) you should avoid them, however. I find it almost impossible to overdo on heat - it may make my eyes water but my body loves it! Very Happy
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J F
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Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 369

PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liver Heat issues? Nah, I'm Vata. I can't remember the last time I threw up. I'm always looking for things to warm me up. LOL I am convinced I was a lizard in my last life.

Now, how do people with arthritis/rheumatisms handle spicy foods? I'd like to recommend this to my Mom, but she's got fibromyalgia.

I do agree that if you are nauseous for any reason (the flu or food poisoning, for example), the last thing you crave at that time is hot and spicy. More like broth and crackers or rice.
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shelley
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
Posts: 7395
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2005 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heat therapy - both food and actual hot compresses and moxibustion (hot acupuncture) are wonderful for rheumatism and fibromyalgia. But first thing anyone should try if they can just open their minds to it is a coffee enema. It's a great way take down pain. And juicing/potassium broth/minerals are essential as the pain is often toxic acidosis.
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